Crude Oil Flowline Solution Case Study (Eagle Ford)

Crude Oil Flowline Solution (Eagle Ford)

Coiled Line Pipe provides a better, faster and more cost efficient way to install steel line pipe in the Eagle Ford.

global tubing coiled line pipe case study
global tubing coiled line pipe case study

Project Overview

A large, independent, oil and gas company, based in Oklahoma City, OK had a field development that required a safe, quick and cost efficient steel flowline installation. The pipeline had multiple road and pipeline crossings and lengthy directionally drilled bores. The Right of Way included a challenging, wetland environment requiring 1400ft bores and installation flexibility on multiple pipeline crossings. Coiled Line Pipe was selected as the solution that provided the greatest cost benefit, highest safety potential and improved product performance as compared to the usual stick steel pipe.

Project Highlights

  • Global Tubing answered the needs of the customer by supplying 11,600 ft of Coiled Line Pipe from stock to deliver the entire quantity requested in eight (8) spools only.
  • The pipe was delivered to site, the Coiled Line Pipe installation from unloading to ditch was 3 times faster than stick steel pipe.
  • The entire pipeline length required 14 welds (including the riser connections, pipeline crossings and road bores).
  • 8 pipeline and road crossings were completed successfully, by pushing and/or pulling the required pipe length in place, while deploying into the ditch and electrostatically testing the coating for damage at the same time.

Conclusion

Global Tubing’s Coiled Line Pipe supplied a no hassle solution for the field needs of the client. Cost Savings of over the steel pipe installation were delivered upon project completion.

By using Coiled Line Pipe, every client can enjoy the peace of mind that only steel pipe’s long history and specification compliance can provide and combine it with the cost savings of a spoolable pipeline.

PROJECT

New, well-to-facility gathering flowline

LOCATION

Big Wells, Texas

APPLICATION

Crude Oil – Multiphase

MATERIAL SPECIFICATION

4″ Nominal OD, Schedule 40
(0.237″ wall thickness)
A53/X52C Coiled Line Pipe
3 Layer Polypropylene Coating

LENGTH

11,600 feet

Crude Oil Flowline Solution Case Study (Eagle Ford)
Crude Oil Flowline Solution Case Study

Crude Oil Flowline Solution

High quality, cost efficient, flowline solution delivers when timing is of the essence.

Project Overview

A locally owned E&P company with a focus on highly productive assets in Mississippi and Louisiana. The company had been using blue-band tubing; threading up and tag welding the tubulars for flowlines from wellhead to gathering tanks and batteries. On this project, the company needed a different solution due to the location of the well, which was subject to review by the Army Corps of Engineers.

The wellhead was set inside the river’s floodplain and unusually high river conditions limited access to the lease to a window of no longer than three weeks in late August.

Utilizing Coiled Line Pipe from Global Tubing, the client installed 17,230 feet of pipe in just three days. The deployment was rather complex and involved six (6) lines located side-by-side, six (6) cased hole pulls and four (4) futures deployed for future tie-in potential.

The Coiled Line Pipe deployment crew consisted of two installation specialists and two pieces of equipment that were mobilized with less than a 48-hour notice from Global Tubing’s main manufacturing and support facility in Dayton, TX.

Project Highlights

  • High-quality product required at competitive cost.
  • The project window was less than 14 days, yet it took only 5 business days from mobilization to de-mobilization of all assets to and from site.
  • The actual pipe stringing took 3 days only with 5,700 feet on average installed per day.

Conclusion

Coiled Line Pipe delivers unprecedented speed of installation for steel pipelines by reducing the intensity of stringing, handling, boring and welding operations by nearly 90%. It is the optimal solution for flowlines where cost, time and efficiency of the essence.

PROJECT

Crude Oil Production

LOCATION

Laurel, Mississippi

APPLICATION

Crude Oil – Multiphase
and Gas-Lift Lines

MATERIAL SPECIFICATION

2 ½” Nominal OD,
Schedule 40, A53B/X52C, 3LPP

LENGTH

17,230 feet

Crude Oil Flowline Solution Case Study
DJ Basin Multi Flowline Project Case Study

DJ Basin Multi Flowline Project

Coiled Line Pipe provides 40% cost savings and a better, faster and more cost efficient way to install steel line pipe in the DJ Basin.

coiled line pipe
coiled line pipe installation
coiled line pipe installation

Project Overview

A large, independent, oil and gas company, based in Houston, TX had a field development that was falling behind schedule due to facilities being complete, but flowlines from the pads taking too much time to build. The customer required a safe, quick and cost efficient steel flowline installation. After rigorous vetting from procurement, engineering and material specialists from the customer, Coiled Line Pipe by Global Tubing was selected as the best solution to replace seamless steel pipe.

 

Project Highlights

  • Global Tubing provided 22 reels of 3,700 ft each of Coiled Line Pipe from stock to quickly deliver the quantity requested by the customer.
  • The Coiled Line Pipe installation, from unloading to ditch, was 4 times faster than stick steel pipe.
  • The entire project had 30 welds as compared to 2000 with steel line pipe.

 

Conclusion

Global Tubing’s Coiled Line Pipe was the most suitable solution for the customer, catching up to schedule and even completing ahead of time and below budget with no compromise to safety and integrity.

PROJECT

New, well-to-facility, multiple gathering flowlines

LOCATION

Fort Lupton, Colorado

APPLICATION

Crude Oil – Multiphase
MATERIAL SPECIFICATION
2″ Nominal OD,
Schedule 80 (0.218″ wall thickness)
A53/X52C Coiled Line Pipe
3 Layer Polypropylene Coating

LENGTH

78,200 feet

DJ Basin Multi Flowline Project Case Study
Cost Savings and Speed in the Permian Case Study

Cost Savings and Speed in the Permian

Coiled Line Pipe provides significant cost advantage to a major independent in New Mexico.

Project Overview

A major independent U.S. E&P needed a fuel gas line completed quickly and within a very tight budget. The pipeline had multiple crossings and the Right of Way included two sweeping 90 degree turns, presenting unique challenges relative to material selection. Coiled Line Pipe was selected as the solution that provided the greatest cost benefit and the highest quality and compliance match to the application needs.

Project Highlights

  • Global Tubing manufactured 78,200 ft of Coiled Line Pipe for the project.
  • The pipe was delivered to site and strung out within a week of delivery, which was 12 times
    faster than what the teams had been used to, by using seamless, steel pipe.
  • The entire pipeline length required only 5 welds (including the riser connections), which were faster and more cost efficient than
    composite connections and did not require special staff or equipment.
  • Pipe crossings were completed by pushing the pipe under, while deploying into the ditch.
  • There were no pipe cuts and no damage to the pipeline’s protective coating or the pipeline itself.
  • After complete deployment of the Coiled Line Pipe, an electrical holiday detection test was completed on the entire pipeline length and it
    registered ZERO DAMAGE.
  • The pipeline material documentation consisted of six MTRs, compared to nearly one hundred for stick pipe, thus proving confidence in the uniformity of the material and full traceability.
  • By using Global Tubing’s Coiled Line Pipe, the customer decreased HSEQ risk and exposure in the field by reducing man-hours worked nearly 65% and equipment hours by almost 61%.

Conclusion

Global Tubing’s Coiled Line Pipe supplied a no hassle solution for the field needs of the client. Cost savings of 12.5% over the steel pipe installation were delivered upon project completion. By using Coiled Line Pipe, every client can enjoy the peace of mind that only steel pipe’s long history and specification compliance can provide combined with the cost savings of a spool-able pipeline.

PROJECT

Coiled Line Pipe for
Transmission Pipeline

LOCATION

Hobbs, New Mexico

APPLICATION

Fuel Gas

MATERIAL SPECIFICATION

4″ Nominal OD,
Schedule 40, A53/X52C
Coiled Line Pipe

LENGTH

3,700 feet

Cost Savings and Speed in the Permian Case Study
Coastal Waters Installation Case Study

Coastal Waters Installation

Coiled Line Pipe proves its value in GOM coastal waters.

Project Overview

One of the largest, privately-held exploration and production companies in the United States needed a fast and cost efficient way to install steel flowlines on two wells. After careful engineering review and competitive bid — with a short weather window and sharp focus on costs, quality and safety — they turned to Global Tubing to provide them with a Coiled Line Pipe solution.

Two reels of Coiled Line Pipe and all the required installation support equipment were delivered from Global Tubing’s Dayton, TX facility to site. The two lines of lengths 2,400 feet and 1,220 feet were installed within 48 hours of delivery. The installation required only one pipe-to-pipe weld and a team of only one trained individual and one support staff. After completing the set-up, the 1,220 foot line was deployed in less than 20 minutes. The client was extremely happy with the timeline and the product performance and is looking forward to utilizing it again on flowline,

Project Highlights

  • Fast installation to minimize the cost of barge and equipment rentals offshore.
  • Record breaking installation speed of 1,220 feet in under 20 minutes (equivalent to approximately two joints of stick pipe per minute).
  • Mobilization-Install-Demobilization window of 48 hours with 2 support staff only.

Conclusion

Global Tubing provided the fastest and most cost efficient alternative for a steel pipeline for the client.

PROJECT

In-field Production Lines

LOCATION

Venice, Louisiana

APPLICATION

Crude Oil – Multiphase

MATERIAL SPECIFICATION

2″ Nominal OD, Schedule 80,
A53B/X52C, 3LPP Coated Pipe

LENGTH

3,620 feet (two lines)

Coastal Waters Installation Case Study
The Davis-Lynch™ Select Surplus Event

The Davis-Lynch™ Select Surplus Event

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Looking for more information about our Davis-Lynch™ downhole solutions?


Ready to Order?


Contact our Davis-Lynch™ experts for more information:
281.582.1100
downhole.technologies@f-e-t.com
Forum Quality Wireline & Cable Greaseless Enviro-Lite E-Line Cables

Practices to Avoid: Greaseless Enviro-Lite E-Line® Cables

Learn practices to AVOID when it comes to Conventional Wireline Cables

Just as we encourage all customers operating conventional cable to follow our recommended best practices, our team of experts have developed a list of the most notable practices we ask customers to AVOID.

  • DO NOT: Tension cycle the line if stuck; this includes surging the well.
  • DO NOT: Pull more than 4,000 lbs. of surface line tension on the cable. If you are required to operate outside of normal RIH/POOH operations, stop and CALL prior to proceeding.
  • DO NOT: Operate the cable in hostile or corrosive environments; this includes H2S or acid.
  • DO NOT: Float tools while RIH; maintain TVD cable weight in fluid while RIH and pumping down.
  • DO NOT: Keep feeding line into the well once pumps are shut down. Around 200’ from your target depth, start reducing the line speed to increase line tension; this will prevent low tension transfer across the drum.
  • DO NOT: Apply more than 1,000 psi on the upper/lower rubber hand pumps over minimal rubber actuation.
  • DO NOT: Continue to run bad rubbers. If excessive pressure is required to maintain the seal, then SOMETHING is wrong – STOP… LAY DOWN the cable and investigate.
  • DO NOT: Use any aerosol spray, solvents or WD40 on the cable.
Forum Quality Wireline & Cable
Forum Quality Wireline & Cable Conventional Cables

Best Practices: Conventional Cables

Learn Best Practices for Conventional Wireline Cables

Our team of wireline experts encourage all customers operating conventional cable to follow our recommended best practices.

  • Ensure the drum’s integrity prior to any installation.
  • Always use a Certified Service Center for installation.
  • Season the cable for first 30 runs.
  • Allow the cable to rotate on the vertical zone of the cable for at least five minutes every 1,000 – 2,000 feet.
  • For new cables, stick to the 80/120 tension rule after the cable is seasoned 50/150.
    • The tension going into the well should never be less than 80% of line weight plus tool weight.
    • The tension coming out of the well should never exceed 120% of the line weight, tool weight, and any drag from the well due to friction that would increase tensions.
  • Use 0.004” to 0.006” clearance flow tubes.
  • Periodically, check cable for:
    • Kinks or shiny spots in cable and mark or note location.
    • Loose armor or torque on the cable.
  • Check the cable electrically pre-job and post-job.
  • Inspect the rope socket components for excessive wear or scaring of cone and washer.
  • Have the cable serviced if you experience any abnormal high tensions or any great loss of tension while on job.
  • Ideally, the unit should be at least 25 feet from the bottom sheave for every 12” of width on your cable drum.
  • Use the proper sheaves size for each cable.
  • When re-heading, check cable for embrittlement.
  • Inspect for cross armor wires while re-heading through flow tubes.
  • When possible, use swivels to help achieve the proper rotation.
  • Bring cable to a service center for retorquing after 80 to 100 runs.
  • Keep an accurate logbook and note all things that you see. This will help the service centers and manufacturer better service your cable for longer life and to resolve any potential cable issues.
Forum Quality Wireline & Cable
Forum Quality Wireline & Cable Greaseless Enviro-Lite E-Line Cables

Best Practices: Greaseless Enviro-Lite E-Line® Cables

Learn Best Practices for Greaseless Enviro-Lite E-Line® Cables

Our team of wireline experts encourage all customers operating greaseless cable to follow our recommended best practices.

  • Stop operations if there seems to be something out of the norm. Make a quick phone call and verify before continuing operations.
  • Keep the line pre-lubed with mineral oil while RIH and POOH. Applying a light spray to each wrap will suffice. During the last run on the pad, spray a light coat to each wrap to help keep the line moisturized between jobs.
  • Maintain lubrication in the lube chamber of the control head; fill when off the well between runs to make sure the cavity is full.
  • At a minimum, there will need to be TVD line weight in fluid maintained while RIH and pumping down to prevent compression of the cable.
  • A minimal element/rubber pressure needs to be maintained to maximize rubber and line life.
  • Follow ALL break-in procedures for a new line being introduced into any operation.
  • The tool weight in air for ALL operations should be no less than 800 lbs.
  • Make note of any cable abnormalities in the line record book, including the measured depth and length of the damaged area.
  • NO more than 60 runs should be ran on ANY re-head.
  • Control heads should be pressure washed and fully rebuilt prior starting a pad.
Forum Quality Wireline & Cable Greaseless Enviro-Lite E-Line Cables
Forum Quality Wireline & Cable Tech Bulletin - Drum Crush

Quality Wireline & Cable Technical Bulletin: Drum Crush

Drum Crush: A Historical Perspective and Basic Prevention Tips

In the early 1950s, the first double armored cables featured rubber-insulated conductors and were installed directly from the factory shipping reel to the truck drum. A 2×4 was commonly wedged under the flange of the shipping reel to establish extra tension. Major service companies developed a “dead man” setup where the turnaround sheave was attached to a 500-pound weight. The payoff brakes were adjusted continuously to keep the weight off the ground. This weight was later increased to 1,000 pounds.

The first “very deep” wells (18,000 to 20,000 feet) logged in West Texas experienced several electrical failures in US Steel cables that were categorized as factory defects. However, these failures were located at a point in the cable that had not been off the drum. In fact, these shorts occurred several layers down from any portion of the cable that had been in the hole. This phenomenon became known as “drum crush.” To better understand how drum crush occurs, new cable was initially spooled back and forth between two trucks, building up tension — 500 pounds at a time — until a tension that was equal to tension in the field was established. This method was successful in simulating drum crush and provided valuable insight.

By the late 1950s, several drum crush solutions had been developed to reduce spooling tension at the wellsite, including a powered capstan or sheave wheel. Later, truck drums were upgraded to withstand the higher tensions, and capstans were used in the major spooling shops to install cable at the required higher spooling tensions.

For many years, the standard for spooling a cable on a drum was a single break system. The cable made the first wrap tightly against the flange. Once completed, the cable had to make a severe bend to step over a full cable diameter for the next wrap, which led to electrical failures when encountering high-spooling tensions. Although less frequently employed today, this single break pattern offers the easiest installation. Currently, the preferred spooling method is the double break pattern where the cable moves over half a cable diameter each half revolution of the drum, thus requiring a less severe bend in the cable.

To establish a double break pattern, the cable makes the first half wrap against the flange. Then, a filler of one-half cable diameter is placed against the drum flange to move the cable over for the last half wrap. A filler is also required for the last half revolution of the final wrap on the drum. For the full cable to spool properly, the breaks must form a straight line across the drum, and the cable must move from the bed layer to the second layer at a point exactly opposite the cable’s entry point on the starting flange.

When a covering layer is positioned back over a lower layer, the wraps of the covering layer fall in the grooves between the lower layer wraps. The diameter of the spooled cable fitting in the grooves increases by only 0.87 of a cable diameter. At the crossover point, the spooled diameter, in theory, increases by a full cable diameter. In practice, however, the cable gets “smashed” at the crossover so the diameter is not a full cable diameter.

On the second and subsequent layers, the breaks fall on top of the breaks of the underlying layer, causing a diameter buildup. If this diameter buildup is just at one point — as with the single break — then the drum full of cable is dynamically out of balance. In deep-hole operations, a drum spooled with a single break will severely shake the truck at high line speeds, while a double break pattern prevents this problem.

Forum Quality Wireline & Cable Tech Bulletin - Drum Crush
Forum Quality Wireline & Cable Tech Bulletin - Drum Crush

Tips to Help Prevent Drum Crush

  • Place a straightedge across the drum core. There should be no visible gaps, which would indicate dips in core diameter. This could cause the cable to drop into the valley and lead to gaps in the spool job, which could result in tension changes and field problems that may ultimately cause drum crush.

 

  • Measure and record the distance between drum flanges at the core and top of the flanges. These distances should not differ by more than one-tenth of the cable diameter. After installation of the cable, if this distance has increased by more than one-half a cable diameter, spooling problems may occur in the field. The extra space between the flanges creates gaps in the cable. The cable may squeeze down into these gaps under load, which may lead to drum crush.

 

  • Check the condition and location of the cable entrance hole on the drum flange. This hole must be touching the drum core. The hole should allow the cable to make a smooth entrance onto the drum to properly start the first wrap. If the cable is not laying properly next to the flange as the second layer covers it, a kink may result. As progressively more layers are added under progressively higher tensions, the cable could short out at this location.

 

  • Establish the double break pattern.

 

  • During cable installation, once the bed layers are established, it is important to ensure that you do not stop while spooling the high-tension layers. If spooling is stopped, the cable tension will fall off, resulting in a “soft” section in the cable that could lead to drum crush. If a stop occurs, it is good practice to pull back to the bed layers and start over.

 

  • When running into the well, it is important to prevent the loss of tension. When tension is lost on the cable, the breaking point backs up and the spool job loosens, causing the cable to become soft. A cable under tension (“hard”) can withstand much higher axial loading. If tension is pulled across this soft section, the cable can crush itself. This crush may not occur immediately, but rather could happen several jobs later. Once tension is lost, the maximum tension that can be applied safely is twice the tension that was measured when the tension was lost. To prevent damage, the cable must be taken to a service center to reestablish the proper tension profile.

 

  • The cables should be tightened periodically at a qualified service center to ensure that the cables remain normalized, i.e., the outer and inner armors are torque balanced.